What Are the Different Neurology Jobs?

Neurology, mainly for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases (cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage), migraine, inflammatory diseases of the brain (encephalitis, meningitis), myelitis, epilepsy (convulsions), Parkinson, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, ataxia , Torsion spasm, autism, senile dementia, neurological degenerative diseases, metabolic diseases and genetic diseases, trigeminal neuralgia, sciatic nerve disease, peripheral neuropathy (numbness and weakness of the limbs) and myasthenia gravis and other neurological diseases, CT, EEG Figures, TCD (transcranial Doppler ultrasound) and hemorheology tests. At the same time, diagnose and treat functional disorders such as neurasthenia and insomnia.

Neurology

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Neurology, main diagnosis and treatment
The neurologist can detect brain, nerve, muscle and spinal diseases. Neurological examination includes medical history, mental state assessment, physical examination, and laboratory diagnostic tests. The difference from a psychiatric examination that assesses patient behavior is that a neurological assessment requires a physical examination. However, abnormal behavior often hints at organic changes in the brain. Before the physical examination and laboratory examination, the doctor meets the patient to know their medical history. The patient is required to describe the current state, and explain exactly where and when these symptoms occur, the frequency, severity, duration, and whether they affect daily work and life.
Patients should tell the doctor about past and present illnesses or surgical history, and severe cases should know about blood relatives, allergic symptoms and current medications. In addition, the doctor should ask the patient if they have work- or family-related difficulties, or if they are experiencing any confusion, because these conditions can affect health and the body's ability to resist disease.
Nerve examination
Physical examinations in the neurology department require systemic examinations, but the focus is on the nervous system. Examinations include cranial, motor, sensory and neuroreflexes. In addition, patients' maternal function, posture, and gait, autonomic nervous system function, and cerebral blood supply also need to be checked.
Cranial nerve examination
The doctor checks the function of 12 pairs of cranial nerves that are directly connected to the brain. Trauma, tumors or infections can damage any part of the cranial nerve. Examination is needed to determine the exact location of the injury.
Inspection of the motor system
Motor nerves innervate voluntary muscles (arbitrary muscles produce movement, such as walking leg muscles.) Injury of motor nerves can lead to paralysis or loss of muscle strength in their innervation. Lack of stimulation of peripheral nerves can lead to muscle atrophy (primary atrophy). The doctor asked the patient to do push-pull movements against resistance to understand the muscle strength of each group.
Sensory nerve
The sensory nerves transmit stress, pain, cold and heat, vibration, movement, and graphic sensations to the brain. Check that the sensory nerves are normal by examining body sensations. When a part of the patient's body surface is numb, stinging or painful, the doctor first pricks the part of the body surface with a pointed needle, and then pricks the same area with a blunt needle to determine whether the patient has sharpness and bluntness. The ability to feel.
reflection
Reflexes are an automatic response of the body to stimuli. For example, using a percussion hammer to gently tap the tendon under the knee, the lower extremity will reflect. This reflection is called the knee tendon reflex (this is a deep tendon reflex). Knee tendon reflexes show the common functions of sensory nerves of the afferent spinal cord, synaptic connections within the spinal cord, and motor nerves that return to the lower limb muscles. The reflex arc is a complete circuit loop from the knee to the spinal cord and back to the leg, without involving the brain.
The neurologist can detect brain, nerve, muscle and spinal diseases. Neurological examination includes medical history, mental state assessment, physical examination, and laboratory diagnostic tests. The difference from a psychiatric examination that assesses patient behavior is that a neurological assessment requires a physical examination. However, abnormal behavior often hints at organic changes in the brain. Before the physical examination and laboratory examination, the doctor meets the patient to know their medical history. The patient is required to describe the current state, and explain exactly where and when these symptoms occur, the frequency, severity, duration, and whether they affect daily work and life. Patients should tell the doctor about past and present illnesses or surgical history, and severe cases should know about blood relatives, allergic symptoms and current medications. In addition, the doctor should ask the patient if they have work- or family-related difficulties, or if they are experiencing any confusion, because these conditions can affect health and the body's ability to resist disease.
Physical examinations in the neurology department require systemic examinations, but the focus is on the nervous system. Examinations include cranial, motor, sensory and neuroreflexes. In addition, patients' maternal function, posture, and gait, autonomic nervous system function, and cerebral blood supply also need to be checked. Cranial nerve examination doctors check the function of 12 pairs of cranial nerves directly connected to the brain. Trauma, tumors or infections can damage any part of the cranial nerve. Examination is needed to determine the exact location of the injury. Examination of the motor system. Motor nerves innervate voluntary muscles (arbitrary muscles produce movement, such as walking leg muscles.) Injury of motor nerves can lead to paralysis or loss of muscle strength. Lack of stimulation of peripheral nerves can lead to muscle atrophy (primary atrophy). The doctor asked the patient to do push-pull movements against resistance to understand the muscle strength of each group. Sensory Nerve The sensory nerve transmits stress, pain, cold and heat, vibration, movement, and graphic sensations to the brain. Check that the sensory nerves are normal by examining body sensations. When a part of the patient's body surface is numb, stinging or painful, the doctor first pricks the part of the body surface with a pointed needle, and then pricks the same area with a blunt needle to determine whether the patient has sharpness and bluntness The ability to feel. Reflex Reflex is an automatic response of the body to a stimulus.

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