What is the Bulbar Conjunctiva?

The conjunctiva covering the anterior sclera of the eyeball is called the bulbar conjunctiva. This conjunctiva is connected to sclera looseness and is easy to push, so bleeding or edema can occur with bulges. Conjunctival epithelium migrates to the corneal epithelium at the limbus, so inflammatory diseases of the conjunctiva also easily spread to the cornea.

The conjunctiva covering the anterior sclera of the eyeball is called the bulbar conjunctiva. This conjunctiva is connected to sclera looseness and is easy to push, so bleeding or edema can occur with bulges. Conjunctival epithelium migrates to the corneal epithelium at the limbus, so inflammatory diseases of the conjunctiva also easily spread to the cornea.
Chinese name
Bulbar conjunctiva
Foreign name
Bulbar conjunctiva
Location
Between the fornix and the limbus
Features
The thinnest part and the most transparent part

Bulbar conjunctiva

Refers to bulbar conjunctival vasodilatation seen in natural light or spotlights. According to the capillary congestion site, the conjunctival congestion is divided into: conjunctival congestion, ciliary congestion, mixed congestion, and localized congestion. Conjunctival congestion is superficial conjunctival vascular congestion, which is often accompanied by mucus or mucopurulent secretions. It is found in conjunctival inflammation and inflammation of surrounding tissues such as the eyelid. Ciliary congestion is the dilation and congestion of the anterior ciliary capillaries in the deep part around the cornea. It is found in keratitis, iris ciliary body inflammation, and closed angle glaucoma. Mixed congestion refers to the mixed presence of conjunctival congestion and ciliary congestion. It is found in more severe corneal and deep eyeball inflammation. Localized congestion refers to congestion around the lesion and is found in scleritis, alveolar keratitis, and pterygium.

Bulbar conjunctiva II, conjunctival segment

The conjunctiva is a thin transparent mucosa with a smooth surface and a certain degree of elasticity. It covers the inner surface of the upper and lower eyelids. It is flipped over the anterior part of the eyeball and stops around the limbus. The sac-like structure is called conjunctival sac. The volume of Chinese conjunctival sac is about 20 l. The upper and lateral conjunctival sacs are deeper and the conjunctival area is larger. Therefore, clinically, the upper and lateral conjunctiva are taken for transposition or transposition. The part of the eyelid that is not covered by the eyelid during normal eyelid opening is clinically called the conjunctiva of palpebral fissure part. Cleft conjunctiva is a common site of various degenerative diseases related to environmental factors such as blepharoplasma and pterygium.
According to the anatomical site, the conjunctiva can be divided into three parts: palpebral conjunctiva, fornix and bulbar conjunctiva.
Bulb conjunctiva is the part covering the outside of the sclera in the front 1/3 of the eyeball. Its width is 8-10mm, the nasal side is 7mm, and the temporal side is 14mm. The bulbar conjunctiva is weaker than the other two parts. Most of the bulbous conjunctiva has loose connective tissue and can be easily pushed on the surface of the sclera. Therefore, wrinkles are more likely to occur under physiological and pathological conditions. Hematoma or edema is most likely to occur clinically, and conjunctival relaxation is prone to occur in the elderly. It is also an ideal site for subconjunctival injection. The conjunctiva is tightly connected with the eyeball fascia and the sclera within the range of 2 to 3mm outside the corneal limbus. Toothballs are often used here to fix the eyeballs during surgery. Under the bulbous conjunctiva is Tenon's sac, and then below the rectus tendon. The bulbar conjunctiva is a group of pigmented cells that are common in people of color. Most of the bulbar conjunctiva are located at the perforation of the sclera when the anterior ciliary blood vessels enter the eye. Therefore, the bulbar conjunctiva is a common place for conjunctival pigmented nevus. In the 2/3 bulbar conjunctival area outside the limbal limb, white finger protrusions arranged radially outward from the cornea are often seen, and each protrusion is 1.5 to 2 mm apart, which is called the limbal fence fence. The fence band is located below the corneal epithelium, and if there are pigment cell clusters, it appears as brown lines, which is considered to be where the limbal stem cells are located. The limbal fence bands are more pronounced on the upper and lower limbus than on the sides.

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